El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
       
     
  No mere decoration, this façade steps out from the existing building to provide shade and creates a space conducive to gathering
       
     
 Just as the structures and mechanisms designed to support the freight railyard are defined by a pared-down effectiveness, this ‘porch’ remains highly functional, providing sun and (moderate) rain shelter, a queueing space for the museum, seating, high visibility signage, and a durable, cost-effective installation. Constructed of a commonplace, reusable set of components – concrete traffic barriers, 2x4 wood studs, and plastic shipping pallets – the screen is both familiar and entirely idiosyncratic, functional and excessive.
       
     
El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
       
     
El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe

SANTA FE, NM - As a temporary façade for this museum in an old railyard warehouse, we propose a new mega-tiled screen, expanding the thin skin of thorough-and-ready shed into a variegated liminal space.

  No mere decoration, this façade steps out from the existing building to provide shade and creates a space conducive to gathering
       
     


No mere decoration, this façade steps out from the existing building to provide shade and creates a space conducive to gathering

 Just as the structures and mechanisms designed to support the freight railyard are defined by a pared-down effectiveness, this ‘porch’ remains highly functional, providing sun and (moderate) rain shelter, a queueing space for the museum, seating, high visibility signage, and a durable, cost-effective installation. Constructed of a commonplace, reusable set of components – concrete traffic barriers, 2x4 wood studs, and plastic shipping pallets – the screen is both familiar and entirely idiosyncratic, functional and excessive.
       
     

Just as the structures and mechanisms designed to support the freight railyard are defined by a pared-down effectiveness, this ‘porch’ remains highly functional, providing sun and (moderate) rain shelter, a queueing space for the museum, seating, high visibility signage, and a durable, cost-effective installation. Constructed of a commonplace, reusable set of components – concrete traffic barriers, 2x4 wood studs, and plastic shipping pallets – the screen is both familiar and entirely idiosyncratic, functional and excessive.